top of page

Search Results

56 items found for ""

  • June Orchids 2018 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Learning Through Sharing This page is dedicated to showing the plants that members brought from their personal collections to share with others at a monthly meeting. Thereby, club members learn through sharing. Each plant is presented, discussed, admired and appreciated. An added feature of this sharing activity results in members feeling closer to each other, creating an atmosphere of friendship and closeness. June 2023 Bulbophyllum [Bulb.] frostii Diane Dickhut Ascocentrum Ampollaceum Alba Alexis Dominguez and Nuria Cid CTSM Dentigrianum 'SVO' Excellent x CTM Extranvaganzn 'SVO' Spotted Beauty Diane Dickhut) Vanda [V.] ampullacea h.f. alba Alexis Dominguez and Nuria Cid V. Sarasiri (V. bensonii x V. curvifolia) 'Red Bird' David Foster Rhynchostylis [Rhy.] retusa Jorge Li Dendrobium [Den.] Jairak Chaste Jorge Li Return to "Share and Learn" Page

  • October Orchids 2019 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Learning Through Sharing This page is dedicated to showing the plants that members brought from their personal collections to share with others at a monthly meeting. Thereby, club members learn through sharing. Each plant is presented, discussed, admired and appreciated. An added feature of this sharing activity results in members feeling closer to each other, creating an atmosphere of friendship and closeness. October 2022 Bulbophyllum [Bulb.] medusae Jorge Li Bulbophyllum [Bulb.] fascinator Diane Dickhut Encyclia [E.] boothiana Jorge Li Return to "Share and Learn" Page

  • EALOC Events Photo Review | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    EALOC Events Photo Review Check out the photos of our four annual events, the field trip, picnic, holiday party and picnic. We know how to party and it's a great time to be with friends and families. Click on the icon to see the photos.

  • Introduction to Orchids 101-2 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Introduction to Orchids...101 (Part 2) The three pages were designed to provide an "orchid pre-primer" to those who have limited knowledge of orchids and want introductory information. Perhaps, more experienced orchid enthusiasts might find interesting facts, as well. The source for this information was Wikipedia (Wiki Website) which is a collaboratively edited, multilingual, free-access, free content Internet encyclopedia that is supported and hosted by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation and owned by Wikimedia Foundation. Please note that each section is notated by the use of a linking button to each specific Wikipedia webpage as a means of referencing the source. The EALOC publisher/editor extracted basic information and photographs from Wikipedia about each of nine orchid groups for this EALOC website. Next to each title is a button where the reader may want to go to the Wikipedia website for indepth reading regarding each specific orchid group. Encyclia · Greek enkykleomai ("to encircle"), referring to the lateral lobes of the lip which encircle the column. · Occurs in Florida, the Caribbean, Mexico, and other regions of the tropical Americas and grows in lowland forests at altitudes up to 1,000 meters. · Most of these species are found in seasonally dry forests where the humidity tends to remain high throughout the year, though precipitation is infrequent, sometimes lacking for months. They are most common in dry oak forests. · Most species have stiff, drought-resistant leaves and large onion- shaped pseudobulbs. · Many are cultivated as ornamental plants. · Flowers may last over a month. · Easily overwatered and require only a periodic misting during the winter. · Have continuously growing rhizomes that eventually create a large mass. In cultivation, growers will divide them by hand to prevent the plants from forming unwieldy mounds. An exception is Encyclia tampensis which does well in a mounded form and does not need to be divided. Go To Wikipedia Oncidium · First described by Olof Swartz in 1800 with the orchid Oncidium altissimum , which has become the type species. · Name derived from the Greek word onkos , meaning "swelling" and refers to the callus at the lower lip. · Widespread from northern Mexico, the Caribbean, and some parts of South Florida (one species) to South America and usually in seasonally dry areas. · Most species are epiphytes (grows in trees), although some are lithophytes (grows in or on rocks) or terrestrials. · Characterized by the presence of column wings, presence of a complicated callus on the lip, pseudobulbs with one to three leaves, and several basal bracts at the base of the pseudobulbs. · Flowers come in shades of yellow, red, white and pink. Petals are often ruffled on the edges, as is the lip. The lip is enormous, partially blocking the small petals and sepals. Go To Wikipedia Paphiopedium · Genus name established by Ernst Hugo Heinrich Pfitzer in 1886. · Derived from Paphos (a city in Cyprus, a place sacred to Aphrodite and ancient Greek pedilon "slipper". Ironically, no paphiopedilum is found on Cyprus. Often called the “Venus slipper”. · Native to Southeast Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, southern China, New Guinea and the Solomon and Bismarck Islands. · Naturally occurs among humus layers as terrestrials on the forest floor, while a few are true epiphytes (grows in trees) and some are lithophytes (grows in or on rocks). · Lack pseudobulbs and, instead, grow robust shoots, each with several leaves. · Commonly referred to as the "lady's-slippers" or "slipper orchids" due to the unusual shape of the pouch-like labellum of the flower. · Pouch traps insects seeking nectar. · Never been successfully cloned for unknown reasons, thus, every plant is unique. Go To Wikipedia Return to Introduction Menu Introduction, Part 3

  • April Field Trip 2019 | ealoclub

    April Field Trip This page is dedicated to showing the photos from the club's annual field trip. This year the group was fortunate to be able to go the "The Kampong". This is the historical residence of Dr. David Fairchild, who was known as the "Christopher Columbus of the Plant World". David and Marian (daughter of Alexander Graham Bell) bought the property in 1916 and permanently moved there after David's retirement from the United States Department of Agriculture (Washington, D.C.) in 1927. The group experienced a 1.5 hour history and garden walking tour, led by two club members who are Kampong docents. As a bonus, the members were treated to a wonderful box lunch, followed by members independently exploring the property. The total experience was a gift to club members. April 2019 Return to Events Photo Review

  • EALOC Newsletters 2011-2014 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Archived Newsletters The club appreciates your interest! To view past newsletters, click on the year desired. For a free online newsletter subscription, please click at the bottom of this page to send the e-mail address. Click on the Desired Range of Years 2011 - 2014 2011 - 2014 2015 - 2017 2018 - 2020 2021 - 2023 2015 - 2017 2018 - 2020 2021 - 2023 2024 - 2026 2024 - 2026 Free Newsletter Subscription Subscribe Your e-mail address was sent successfully!

  • Introduction to Orchids 101-3 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Introduction to Orchids...101 (Part 3) The three pages were designed to provide an "orchid pre-primer" to those who have limited knowledge of orchids and want introductory information. Perhaps, more experienced orchid enthusiasts might find interesting facts, as well. The source for this information was Wikipedia (Wiki Website) which is a collaboratively edited, multilingual, free-access, free content Internet encyclopedia that is supported and hosted by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation and owned by Wikimedia Foundation. Please note that each section is notated by the use of a linking button to each specific Wikipedia webpage as a means of referencing the source. The EALOC publisher/editor extracted basic information and photographs from Wikipedia about each of nine orchid groups for this EALOC website. Next to each title is a button where the reader may want to go to the Wikipedia website for indepth reading regarding each specific orchid group. Phalaenopsis · Generic name probably a reference to the genus Phalaena, the name given by Carl Linnaeus to a group of large moths. · Known as the Moth Orchid and is one of the most popular orchids in the trade, through the development of many artificial hybrids. · Native to southern China, the Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia (Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, et. al.), New Guinea, the Bismark Archipelago and Queensland. · Most are epiphytic (grows in trees) shade plants; a few are lithophytes (grows in or on rocks). In the wild, some species grow below the canopies of moist and humid lowland forests, protected against direct sunlight; others grow in seasonally dry or cool environments. They have adapted individually to these three habitats. · Has neither pseudobulbs nor rhizome, Has a monopodial (single trunk or stem) growth habit. Blooms appear from the stem between the leaves. and last for several weeks. At home, the flowers may last two to three months. · Often produce numerous aerial roots that often hang down in long drapes and have green chlorophyll underneath the grey root coverings. Go To Wikipedia Phragmipedium · Phragmipedium besseae was first found in Peru by Elizabeth Locke Besse in 1981. · Derived from the Greek phragma , which means "division", and pedium , which means "slipper" (referring to the pouch). · Lady's slipper orchids are found from SW Mexico, Central and tropical South America. · Most are either terrestrial, epiphytic (grows in trees) or lithophytic (grows in or on rocks). · Shows a unique shieldlike staminode (rudimentary, sterile or abortive stamen, which means that it does not produce pollen), long, moustache-like petals and a 3- locular ovary. The large pouch-like lip is curved inwards at the margins. · Short stemmed and is semi-terrestrial, semi-lithophytic (on rocks) to epiphytic (in trees). Go To Wikipedia Vanilla · Vanilla is a flavor derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla , primarily from the Mexican species, flat-leaved vanilla. · Word derived from the the Spanish word vaina (vaina itself meaning sheath or pod), translated as “little pod”. · Pollination is required to set the fruit from which the flavoring is derived. In 1837, Belgian botanist Charles François Antoine Morren pioneered a method of artificially pollinating the plant. · The various subspecies are grown on Madagascar, Réunion, and other tropical areas along the Indian Ocean, South Pacific; and the West Indies, and Central and South America. · Three major species of vanilla currently are grown globally, all of which derive from a species originally found in Mesoamerica, including parts of modern- day Mexico. · Second most expensive spice after saffron. · Grows as a vine, climbing up an existing tree (also called a tutor), pole, or other support. · A simple and efficient artificial hand-pollination method was developed by a 12- year-old slave named Edmond Albius on Réunion, a method still used today. · Flower lasts about one day. · Reproduced the plant by cutting and removing sections of the vine with six or more leaf nodes, a root opposite each leaf. Two lower leaves are removed, and buried in loose soil. Growth is rapid under good conditions. Go To Wikipedia Return to Introduction Menu

  • FIU Plant Science Scholarship | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    FIU Annual Student Plant Science Scholarship The members of Eastern Airlines Orchid Club are very grateful and appreciative of all the years of working with Florida International University. As part of our gratitude, the club is giving back to the community by sponsoring an annual scholarship award to a worthy FIU student. The club will fund a $1,000 scholarship for a plant science student during the Fall semester. FIU will create and manage the program, as well as select the winning individual. Excitedly, once selected, the student will attend one of our monthly meetings to receive the check. That way, the club members can have the pleasure of meeting the student, making it special for both club members and recipient!

bottom of page