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  • Introduction to Orchids 101-1 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Introduction to Orchids...101 The three pages were designed to provide an "orchid pre-primer" to those who have limited knowledge of orchids and want introductory information. Perhaps, more experienced orchid enthusiasts might find interesting facts, as well. The source for this information was Wikipedia (Wiki Website) which is a collaboratively edited, multilingual, free-access, free content Internet encyclopedia that is supported and hosted by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation and owned by Wikimedia Foundation. Please note that each section is notated by the use of a linking button to each specific Wikipedia webpage as a means of referencing the source. The EALOC publisher/editor extracted basic information and photographs from Wikipedia about each of nine orchid groups for this EALOC website. Next to each title is a button where the reader may want to go to the Wikipedia website for indepth reading regarding each specific orchid group. Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Click on Picture or Number

  • September Orchids 2019 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Learning Through Sharing This page is dedicated to showing the plants that members brought from their personal collections to share with others at a monthly meeting. Thereby, club members learn through sharing. Each plant is presented, discussed, admired and appreciated. An added feature of this sharing activity results in members feeling closer to each other, creating an atmosphere of friendship and closeness. September 2023 A. Orange Glow x A. Lenakamolphum Alexis Dominguez and Nuria Cid Vanda Arthorn Alexis Dominguez and Nuria Cid Vanda [V.] Violeta “Banjong” V. Amoena (V. coerulea x V. tessellata) Jorge Li Onc. Mariposa “Special” -Three Tips Diane Dickhut Brassolaeli (BL) Caribbean Holiday Orchids by Eli 2008 (RSH) (B. Nodosa x L. Undlata) Jorge Li Encyclia Hybrid (Jairak Treasure ‘Kakapo Bird’) Jorge Li Return to "Share and Learn" Page

  • Interesting Orchid Websites | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Interesting, Informational and Useful Websites (Part 1) Below are website links that were selected for being interesting, informational and/or useful for orchid enthusiasts. Readers are encouraged to give feedback, as well as send additional website links to the webmaster. Please go to the "Feedback and About" webpage to offer feedback and other website links. The reader's input is the key to making this page helpful to everyone. Do you have an interesting website to share? Please e-mail the website address and it can be shared with everyone. E-Mail Link Link Internet Orchid Species Photo Encyclopedia This website offers an orchid species photographic encyclopedia, containing 17,556 species in 862 genera. This encyclopedia is updated often and encourages orchid enthusiasts to send in additional orchid information and photographs. The author encourages support for the website by sending a $10.00 a year subscription. The money goes directly to providing additional reference materials and no funds are used for personal reasons. What's Your Birth Orchid? This website identifies an orchid for each birth month. Just click on the birth month link and the reader will to be able to read a brief description of the birth orchid, as well as the meaning of the flower. What personal characteristics does your orchid denote? Link Orchids on Trees Photographs This link offers outstanding, quality photographs of orchids in trees. All orchids are identified. This is a site for purely enjoyment and appreciation for the plants that grow in nature. Enjoy!!! Link Homemade Orchid Fertilizer This is an interesting article. It describes common ingredients found in the home that are sources of nutrition for orchids. Even if the user doesn't choose to try the recipes, useful and interesting facts are discussed that pertain to maintaining the health of one's plants. Link Rare Unusual Orchids The contents of this website is to exhibit photographs of some of the most extraordinary rare orchids. The photography is excellent. These pictures are gleamed from various different websites. Among the photo collection, but sure to check out the White Egret Orchid, the Naked Fairy Orchid and even an Angry Orchid!!! Link Wild Tropical, Rare, and Some Hybrid Orchids Galleries This link takes the reader to Pieter C. Brouwer's gallery of photographs of wild, rare and hybrid orchids. Many orchids are galleries, whereby, the user only has to click on a gallery to view a multitude of related orchids. All photographs are superior in quality. Enjoy!!! Interesting Websites, (Part 2)

  • Local Orchid Clubs | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Local Orchid Clubs Besides EALOC, there are a variety of excellent orchid clubs located in Miami-Dade County. Below are the online links where one may find out more about each organization. Orchid enthusiasts are one family sharing a common love! Please check out our friends' organizations. Asociacion de Orquideologia de America Orchid Society of Coral Gables Coalition for Orchid Species East Everglades Orchid Society North Dade Orchid Club Pan American Orchid Club South Dade Amateur Orchid Club South Florida Orchid Society

  • Interesting Orchid Websites 6 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Interesting, Informational and Useful Websites (Part 6) Below are website links that were selected for being interesting, informational and/or useful for orchid enthusiasts. Readers are encouraged to give feedback, as well as send additional website links to the webmaster. Please go to the "Feedback and About" webpage to offer feedback and other website links. The reader's input is the key to making this page helpful to everyone. Link National Geographic - Search for Ghost Orchid Pollinator ​ These rare, charming orchids were long thought to be pollinated by a single insect: the giant sphinx moth. But now, photographs by Carlton Ward Jr. and Mac Stone show that a couple of moth species other than the giant sphinx visit and carry the ghost orchid’s pollen—and the giant sphinx itself may play a completely different role than previously thought. Link Rare Florida "Night Orchids" Saved by Common Fruits This video explains, for the first time, scientists have used a mix of natural products found locally to propagate the flower. Link TBA Link TBA Link TBA "Interesting , Websites (Part 1)"

  • EALOC Newsletters 2021 - 2023 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Newsletters 2021 - 2023 The club appreciates your interest! To view past newsletters, click on the year and month. For a free online newsletter subscription, please click at the bottom of this page to send the e-mail address. 2021 Click on the Desired Monthly Edition February January March April May June July August September October November December 2022 Click on the Desired Monthly Edition January February March April May June July August September October November December 2023 Click on the Desired Monthly Edition April March February January May June July August September October November December Free Newsletter Subscription Subscribe Your e-mail address was sent successfully! Archived Newsletters

  • Interesting Orchid Websites 4 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Interesting, Informational and Useful Websites (Part 4) Below are website links that were selected for being interesting, informational and/or useful for orchid enthusiasts. Readers are encouraged to give feedback, as well as send additional website links to the webmaster. Please go to the "Feedback and About" webpage to offer feedback and other website links. The reader's input is the key to making this page helpful to everyone. Link Amazing Trees This website's contents aren't about orchids. However, the trees that are pictured at this site are simply superb. Nature is a wonderous things. Orchids are unquestionably beautiful, but these trees are equally astounding!!! Even though they're not orchids, they're truly worthy of being shared and enjoyed. Link Dracula Vampire Orchid Dracula Vampira Orchid is sometimes called the Black Orchid, This Dracula Vampira Orchid grows in the heated greenhouse. Being in the purtho family this orchid blooms best with low to medium light, (Phalaenopsis orchid is bright, but not cattleya orchid) and intermediate to cool temps. Link An Orchid By A ny Other Name: An Asparagus? This is an article regarding the relationship of the orchid and the asparagus. What??? It's now being said that "scientists say, studies of the DNA of orchids are revealing a host of surprises, chief among them, that orchids are actually part of the asparagus group, closer kin to these vegetables than to the other, flashier, flowering plants they had been placed with before." Link The Wonders of Blooming Flowers This is not a website. Rather, it's a link to a video which enables the viewer to observe a variety of flowers in the process of blooming. Each flower was filmed for two days to get the effect of the blossoming process. Even though this video is not orchid-specfic, it's worth the time for all lovers of flowers to experience. Sit back and smell the flowers. Gail Eller is credited for sharing this link. Link Monkey Orchid The Monkey Orchid , also known as Orchid Simia or Dracula Simia (monkey dragon), has its home in the forests of Peru and Ecuador, and it grows at about 2000 feet above sea levels. It was given its name by botanist Carlyle A. Lauren back in 1978, due to its resemblance to the funny animal. There are 118 known varieties of this orchid in Central America, Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Ecuador, where half of them are located. Interesting Websites, (Part 1) Interesting Websites, (Part 5

  • February Orchids 2020 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Learning Through Sharing This page is dedicated to showing the plants that members brought from their personal collections to share with others at a monthly meeting. Thereby, club members learn through sharing. Each plant is presented, discussed, admired and appreciated. An added feature of this sharing activity results in members feeling closer to each other, creating an atmosphere of friendship and closeness. February 2024 Phalaenopsis Norman’s Mini Eagle Jorge LI Circ. Blue Comet Enc. Cochleata x Guarechea Mivaetolle Noire “Indigo Blue” Jorge Li Phalaenopsis Jiaho’s Pink Girl “Sweet Fragrance” Schilleriana x Zuma Pixie Jorge Li Return to "Share and Learn" Page

  • More Orchid Club History | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    More Club History The second meeting of the orchid club was held August 18, 1963, at the Eastern Airlines new recreation center. As a means of fundraising at each meeting, the raffle was started. For the purchase of a 25 cent raffle ticket, people took a chance on winning an orchid to add to their collections. The club promoted and continues to promote education in the culture and care of orchids among hobbyists. The club was and continues to be very active in the community. When the Jetport was first built in the Everglades in the early 1970's, the EALOC members made numerous rescue missions around the new training Jetport to save orchids destined for destruction. These rescued orchids were transplanted to Grossman's Hammock because most of the naturally growing orchids in the hammock had been stripped away by collectors. As contractors developed areas of the Everglades, beginning in 1974, EALOC members collected orchids to relocate them. During a fire in April 1974, the club members made a valiant effort in an area west of the Fahkahatchee Strand in the Big Cypress Swamp to save orchids that would have gone up in smoke. The members planned on working over as many areas as they could until sundown. However, the fires in the area were being fanned by the wind and the group had to call it quits by noon. They had rescued 300 plants which were also placed in Grossman's Hammock. At least 10 native species were saved at that time. During these rescue missions, the club worked closely with the resident ranger, Lieutenant Martin. Visit EALOC On Facebook

  • February Orchids 2020 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Learning Through Sharing This page is dedicated to showing the plants that members brought from their personal collections to share with others at a monthly meeting. Thereby, club members learn through sharing. Each plant is presented, discussed, admired and appreciated. An added feature of this sharing activity results in members feeling closer to each other, creating an atmosphere of friendship and closeness. March 2024 Maxillariella [Mxl.] tenuifolia Jorge Li Oncidium Heaven Scent “Redolence” Jorge Li Phalaenopsis schilleriana Jorge Li Cyrtopodium punctatum “Cowhorn Orchid” Lou and Rene Silva “Not Identified” Eleanor Sanfilippo Return to "Share and Learn" Page

  • Kampong Orchid Crew | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Kampong Orchid Crew Visit The Kampong Website The Kampong began not as a botanical garden, but as a personal collection motivated by Dr. David Fairchild’s love for, and scientific interest in, ornamental, edible, and ethnobotanic plants. Dr. Catherine Sweeney continued to develop the collection in that spirit. It contains a diverse array of plants from the tropics and warm subtropics, including tropical fruits, palms, flowering trees, flowering shrubs, and vines. ​ EALOC has a community initiative whereby volunteers assist the Kampong by mounting and maintaining the garden's orchid collection. There are two crews consisting of three individuals each. The crews alternate scheduled times. The Kampong

  • Queen of the Night's Bloom | ealoclub

    "Queen of the Night" - Pictorial Journey of Its Bloom The epiphyllum oxypetalum, or “Queen of the Night” cactus, is a perennial that can grow to be up to 10 feet tall. This bloom’s journey of this succulent is both secretive and seductive.\ It blooms during the night and the next morning it is closed, never to open again. To observe this wonder, one must be extremely vigilant. The telltale sign of its premiere performance is when, for approximately three or four days before opening, the stems of the blooms begin to turn upward. These photos are sequenced from beginning to end. The bloom fully opened around 10:00 pm and closed at sunrise. Take note of the angle of the upturning stems previous to blooming. The final morning, the stems dropped. Queen 1 Queen 2 Queen 11 Queen 1 1/11 Click on "Left and Right" Arrows On Sides of Each Slide to Navigate Through Frames.

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