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  • FTBG National Orchid Garden - Part 1 | ealoclub

    FTBG "National Orchid Garden" - Part 1 Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden initiated its newest conservation project, officially started on March 8 - 10, 2019, as part of its "International Orchid Festival" event. FTBG's goal is to become known as "The National Orchid Garden" whereby it will exhibit the largest orchid collection in the Western Hemisphere. Hundreds of thousands, if not a million, orchids will be placed throughout the garden. 90% of these orchids will be permanently mounted. A slideshow show was created to both describe the entire project and show photographs of orchids that have already been placed in the garden. This slideshow comes in three(3) parts, located on three(3) separate website pages. ​ ***Please note that FTBG is not renaming the garden. Instead, it wants to be recognized as a national garden for orchids. 1 41 0 1/42 Return to Slideshow Introuction Click on "Left and Right" Arrows On Sides of Each Slide to Navigate Through Frames. Red Circles on Maps Denote Locales of Garden

  • Introduction to Orchids 101-2 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Introduction to Orchids...101 (Part 2) The three pages were designed to provide an "orchid pre-primer" to those who have limited knowledge of orchids and want introductory information. Perhaps, more experienced orchid enthusiasts might find interesting facts, as well. The source for this information was Wikipedia (Wiki Website) which is a collaboratively edited, multilingual, free-access, free content Internet encyclopedia that is supported and hosted by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation and owned by Wikimedia Foundation. Please note that each section is notated by the use of a linking button to each specific Wikipedia webpage as a means of referencing the source. The EALOC publisher/editor extracted basic information and photographs from Wikipedia about each of nine orchid groups for this EALOC website. Next to each title is a button where the reader may want to go to the Wikipedia website for indepth reading regarding each specific orchid group. Encyclia · Greek ("to encircle"), referring to the lateral lobes of the lip which enkykleomai encircle the column. · Occurs in Florida, the Caribbean, Mexico, and other regions of the tropical Americas and grows in lowland forests at altitudes up to 1,000 meters. · Most of these species are found in seasonally dry forests where the humidity tends to remain high throughout the year, though precipitation is infrequent, sometimes lacking for months. They are most common in dry oak forests. · Most species have stiff, drought-resistant leaves and large onion- shaped pseudobulbs. · Many are cultivated as ornamental plants. · Flowers may last over a month. · Easily overwatered and require only a periodic misting during the winter. · Have continuously growing rhizomes that eventually create a large mass. In cultivation, growers will divide them by hand to prevent the plants from forming unwieldy mounds. An exception is which does well in a Encyclia tampensis mounded form and does not need to be divided. Go To Wikipedia Oncidium · First described by Olof Swartz in 1800 with the orchid , Oncidium altissimum which has become the type species. · Name derived from the Greek word , meaning "swelling" and refers to the onkos callus at the lower lip. · Widespread from northern Mexico, the Caribbean, and some parts of South Florida (one species) to South America and usually in seasonally dry areas. · Most species are epiphytes (grows in trees), although some are lithophytes (grows in or on rocks) or terrestrials. · Characterized by the presence of column wings, presence of a complicated callus on the lip, pseudobulbs with one to three leaves, and several basal bracts at the base of the pseudobulbs. · Flowers come in shades of yellow, red, white and pink. Petals are often ruffled on the edges, as is the lip. The lip is enormous, partially blocking the small petals sepals. and Go To Wikipedia Paphiopedium · Genus name established by Ernst Hugo Heinrich Pfitzer in 1886. · Derived from (a city in Cyprus, a place sacred to Aphrodite and ancient Paphos Greek "slipper". Ironically, no paphiopedilum is found on Cyprus. pedilon Often called the “Venus slipper”. · Native to Southeast Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, southern China, New Guinea and the Solomon and Bismarck Islands. · Naturally occurs among humus layers as terrestrials on the forest floor, while a few are true epiphytes (grows in trees) and some are lithophytes (grows in or on rocks). · Lack pseudobulbs and, instead, grow robust shoots, each with several leaves. · Commonly referred to as the "lady's-slippers" or "slipper orchids" due to the unusual shape of the pouch-like labellum of the flower. · Pouch traps insects seeking nectar. · Never been successfully cloned for unknown reasons, thus, every plant is unique. Go To Wikipedia Introduction, Part 1 Introduction, Part 3

  • January Orchids 2020 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Learning Through Sharing This page is dedicated to showing the plants that members brought from their personal collections to share with others at a monthly meeting. Thereby, club members learn through sharing. Each plant is presented, discussed, admired and appreciated. An added feature of this sharing activity results in members feeling closer to each other, creating an atmosphere of friendship and closeness. January 2020 Cattleya [C.] lueddemanniana "Gabriela" x "Drago" Jorge Li Return to "Share and Learn" Page

  • December Holiday Party | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    December Holiday Party The annual holiday party brings club members and guests together for fun, food and strictly for a good time. The food was abundant and delicious. Each member received an orchid plant of choice as a gift. It pays to be an EALOC club member!!! Club members created orchid-related holiday table pieces. Every entry was a winner and was awarded a poinsettia, as well. December 2019 Return to Events Photo Review

  • Introduction to Orchids 101-3 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Introduction to Orchids...101 (Part 3) The three pages were designed to provide an "orchid pre-primer" to those who have limited knowledge of orchids and want introductory information. Perhaps, more experienced orchid enthusiasts might find interesting facts, as well. The source for this information was Wikipedia (Wiki Website) which is a collaboratively edited, multilingual, free-access, free content Internet encyclopedia that is supported and hosted by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation and owned by Wikimedia Foundation. Please note that each section is notated by the use of a linking button to each specific Wikipedia webpage as a means of referencing the source. The EALOC publisher/editor extracted basic information and photographs from Wikipedia about each of nine orchid groups for this EALOC website. Next to each title is a button where the reader may want to go to the Wikipedia website for indepth reading regarding each specific orchid group. Phalaenopsis · Generic name probably a reference to the genus Phalaena, the name given by Carl Linnaeus to a group of large moths. · Known as the Moth Orchid and is one of the most popular orchids in the trade, through the development of many artificial hybrids. · Native to southern China, the Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia (Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, et. al.), New Guinea, the Bismark Archipelago and Queensland. · Most are epiphytic (grows in trees) shade plants; a few are lithophytes (grows in or on rocks). In the wild, some species grow below the canopies of moist and humid lowland forests, protected against direct sunlight; others grow in seasonally dry or cool environments. They have adapted individually to these three habitats. · Has neither pseudobulbs nor rhizome, Has a monopodial (single trunk or stem) growth habit. Blooms appear from the stem between the leaves. and last for several weeks. At home, the flowers may last two to three months. · Often produce numerous aerial roots that often hang down in long drapes and have green chlorophyll underneath the grey root coverings. Go To Wikipedia Phragmipedium · was first found in Peru by Elizabeth Locke Besse in 1981. Phragmipedium besseae · Derived from the Greek , which means "division", and , which phragma pedium means "slipper" (referring to the pouch). · Lady's slipper orchids are found from SW Mexico, Central and tropical South America. · Most are either terrestrial, epiphytic (grows in trees) or lithophytic (grows in or on rocks). · Shows a unique shieldlike staminode (rudimentary, sterile or abortive stamen, which means that it does not produce pollen), long, moustache-like petals and a 3- locular ovary. The large pouch-like lip is curved inwards at the margins. · Short stemmed and is semi-terrestrial, semi-lithophytic (on rocks) to epiphytic (in trees). Go To Wikipedia Vanilla · Vanilla is a flavor derived from orchids of the genus , primarily from the Vanilla Mexican species, flat-leaved vanilla. · Word derived from the the Spanish word (vaina itself meaning sheath or vaina pod), translated as “little pod”. · Pollination is required to set the fruit from which the flavoring is derived. In 1837, Belgian botanist Charles François Antoine Morren pioneered a method of artificially pollinating the plant. · The various subspecies are grown on Madagascar, Réunion, and other tropical areas along the Indian Ocean, South Pacific; and the West Indies, and Central and South America. · Three major species of vanilla currently are grown globally, all of which derive from a species originally found in Mesoamerica, including parts of modern- day Mexico. · Second most expensive spice after saffron. · Grows as a vine, climbing up an existing tree (also called a tutor), pole, or other support. · A simple and efficient artificial hand-pollination method was developed by a 12- year-old slave named Edmond Albius on Réunion, a method still used today. · Flower lasts about one day. · Reproduced the plant by cutting and removing sections of the vine with six or more leaf nodes, a root opposite each leaf. Two lower leaves are removed, and buried in loose soil. Growth is rapid under good conditions. Go To Wikipedia Introduction, Part 1

  • February Orchids 2020 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Learning Through Sharing This page is dedicated to showing the plants that members brought from their personal collections to share with others at a monthly meeting. Thereby, club members learn through sharing. Each plant is presented, discussed, admired and appreciated. An added feature of this sharing activity results in members feeling closer to each other, creating an atmosphere of friendship and closeness. February 2020 Paphiopedilum Black Buddha (Paphiopedilum Masupi x Paphiopedilum Somers Isles) David Foster Bulbophyllum [Bulb.] lasiochilum David Foster Dendrobium Hawaiian Twinkle (Dendrobium Jaquelyn Thomas x Dendrobium Blue Twin) Ralph Hernandez Paphiopedilum [Paph.] Harold Koopowitz David Foster Return to "Share and Learn" Page Tolumnia (Not Identified) Ron Rosentha Vanda Orquídea Santos (Vanda Suzanne Rutzke x Vanda Jean Morgan Gilliland) Danny Lutz Dendrobium Blue Angel (Dendrobium Blue Bonnet x Dendrobium gouldii) Ralph Hernandez Dendrobium Rambo (Dendrobium Doctor Uthai x Dendrobium Ly) Ralph Hernandez

  • July Orchids 2019 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Learning Through Sharing This page is dedicated to showing the plants that members brought from their personal collections to share with others at a monthly meeting. Thereby, club members learn through sharing. Each plant is presented, discussed, admired and appreciated. An added feature of this sharing activity results in members feeling closer to each other, creating an atmosphere of friendship and closeness. July 2019 Vanda [V.] (syn. Ascocenda or Ascda.) Su-Fun Beauty Ralph Hernandez Myrmecophila [Mcp.] brysiana 'Carolyn Bradham' “Hacklers” Ralph Hernandez Neostylis Lou Sneary “Bluebird” Diane Dickhut Vanda [V.] (syn. Ascocenda or Ascda.) Memoria Carol Wiegel X Vanda [V.] vietnamica (syn. Christensonia vietnamica) Ralph Hernandez Vanda [V.] (syn. Ascofinetia or Ascf.) Cherry Blossom Jorge Li Bromecanthe [Brm.] (syn. Schombocatonia or Smbcna.) Garnet Glory “Juno Beach” Lou and Rene Silva Enanthleya [Eny.] (syn. Epicattleya or Epc.) Middleburg “Maj” Lou and Rene Silva Cattalonia??? Diane Dickhut Dyakia [Dy.] hendersoniana “Kelsie and Ryan” Maria and Tony Almodovar Return to "Share and Learn" Page

  • EALOC Member Renewal | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    EALOC Membership Renewals This page is dedicated to current members who want to renew their memberships. Annual membership fees are due each June. Dues should be paid by September. If later, those members will not be eligible to receive a holiday plant at the annual holiday party. It's easy to renew and it can be done using this page. Just download and complete the form below. You may e-mail the form, as well as pay online. That's all there is to it !!! : Directions ​ Click on the file folder, then, on the file name. The Word document will automatically be ready for downloading and saving to the user's computer. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Download and complete the application. Then, e-mail the form to the website publisher. When sending the application, type in the subject box the following information: ​ "MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL" ​ Send form to . ealoclub@gmail.com Renew any time via PayPal. It's quick and easy!!! Click on the "Renew Dues Via PayPal" below. $15.00 Per Member ​ No PayPal? Directions to Use Credit or Debit Card 1. Click button, enter amount of member fee remittances and click . "Remit Dues" "Continue" 2. At page, click "PayPal Log In" "Pay with Credit or Debit C button a ard" t bottom of page, enter card information and click . "Continue"

  • Interesting Orchid Websites 3 | Miami | Eastern Airlines Orchid Club

    Interesting, Informational and Useful Websites (Part 3) Below are website links that were selected for being interesting, informational and/or useful for orchid enthusiasts. Readers are encouraged to give feedback, as well as send additional website links to the webmaster. Please go to the "Feedback and About" webpage to offer feedback and other website links. The reader's input is the key to making this page helpful to everyone. Link Unusual and Interesting Orchids On this website, the user will be offered many images of unusual and interesting orchids. By passing the mouse over the image, text will appear that describes and talks about the orchid. Also, the website address of every image is given so the reader may possibly have a resource for additional information. Be sure to click on "Show More Images" at the bottom of the page to reveal additional photographs. Link Orchid Forums Orchid Forum is a website that list a variety of blogs that address different subject. Do you need a solution to an orchid problem? Are you seeking specific information? You can connect with others through a blog. Choose the blog that relates to what you are seeking. In order to post, you may have to register. Link 5 Interesting Facts About Orchids Do you think you know most everything about orchids? Check this wesite and find out. Perhaps, you'll discover an interesting fact you never knew. Link The Uses and Misuses of Orchids in Medicine Orchid products, the tubers, leaves or flowers, were introduced into medicine with no testing for human use, and ultimately their use has declined, not through being proven ineffective, but more through lack of evidence and changes in fashion. This article examines the medicinal uses of orchid plants in the Orient, Europe, the Americas, Australia and Africa, and concludes by examining their usage today. Link 15 Unusual Flowers of the World On this website, the reader will be able to view and read about unique flowers. Additionally, one can view other plants around the world. There are a large variety of plant categories. Find out about plants listed by "zones" throughout the world, as well. Interesting Websites, (Part 1) Interesting Websites, (Part 4)

  • International Orchid Foundation | Miami | Eastern Ailines Orchid Club

    International Orchid Foundation This is another opportunity to connect with others. It's also a chance to share and learn. The webmaster registered the club with this organization. By doing so, EALOC is now advertised within a 150 mile radius and registered members will be able to see events within that same radius. OrchidMap and Orchid Agenda move to ORCHIDS.ORG Today we are announcing an agreement with the International Orchid Foundation (IOF) to migrate OrchidMap and Orchid Agenda to ORCHIDS.ORG, a new free-usage website dedicated to promoting orchid growing. ORCHIDS.ORG contains information on 527 orchid societies, 444 orchid vendors, 64 public gardens and 36 judging centers. We feel it is a better forum for publicizing this information as it allows members to add their own organizations and schedule their own events. The ORCHIDS.Org database also includes over 150,000 orchid hybrids and more than 30,000 species. Members can add orchids to their collection, upload photos and share culture tips for each specific plant with other members. We know the IOF is looking for coordinators. When you become the coordinator for a society or vendor, not only can you change the contact information but also add event. All members logging in from a location within 150 miles of the event will see information about it on the home page. The International Orchid Foundation is a non-profit organization made up of volunteers who promote orchid growing via participation in the web site ORCHIDS.ORG and other initiatives. The organization coordinates closely with orchid societies vendors and botanical gardens, with the goal of getting more people to learn about and to grow orchids. The IOF is a 501 C3 public charity. Contributions to it are deductible under section 170 of the United States Internal Revenue Code.